Preclinical Electives

This listing is updated as of June 2019; elective course offerings may vary from year to year based on faculty availability, student interests, and other factors. Student Doctors may be eligible to take elective courses offered by other colleges. Most elective courses earn one unit of credit unless noted otherwise. Grading is on a pass/fail basis unless otherwise noted. Please contact the course coordinator(s) for more information and registration procedure. Any questions in regards to the preclinical electives program, please contact Dr. Clipper Young, PharmD at clipper.young@tu.edu.
 

Advanced Anatomy 1 (Fall)                     BSCC 659     Available Fall 2019

Advanced Anatomy 2 (Spring)                BSCC 660     Available Spring 2020

Course Co-Coordinators

     Bruce Silverman, BS (bruce.silverman@tu.edu)

     David Eliot, PhD (david.eliot@tu.edu)

Course Description:

The objective of these courses is to formalize student prosection into a directed learning experience that benefits both the enrolled students (in terms of focused study of human anatomy and potential development of research projects) and the students taking Human Anatomy as part of the curriculum of any of our colleges. The elective is open to second-year osteopathic medical students and to students who have taken the anatomy course that is offered as part of the physician assistant program. Participants will perform directed prosections in pursuit of their own learning projects and for extended study by first-year students in these programs. Enrollment in Advanced Anatomy I is not a prerequisite for enrollment in Advanced Anatomy 2 and the topic areas are distinct.

Note: Advanced Anatomy 1 is open to OMS II students only; Advanced Anatomy 2 is open to OMS I students only.

 

Art of Observation (Fall & Spring)     BSCC 665     Available Fall 2019 & Spring 2020

Course Coordinator:

     Tamira Elul, PhD (tamira.elul@tu.edu)

Course Description

This elective involves focused observation of people in fine art paintings and discussions of your observations.  The objectives are to enhance medical students’ visual diagnostic, and critical thinking skills based on observation, as well as their emotional engagement, and interpretive abilities regarding their patients.  The Art of Observation elective comprises seven sessions, each 1-1.5 hours.  Four of the sessions will be held on campus and three off-campus at local museums.

Note: Open to all students 

 

Biodynamic Osteopathy Series (Fall & Spring) 

OMMC 655      Biodynamic Osteopathy I     Available Fall 2019

OMMC 655A    Biodynamic Osteopathy IA   

OMMC 656      Biodynamic Osteopathy II    Available Spring 2020

OMMC 656A   Biodynamic Osteopathy IIA  

Course Coordinator:

     Jennifer Weiss, DO (jennifer.weiss@tu.edu)

Course Description

Biodynamic Osteopathy I and II are introductory courses offered to students who have completed a minimum of one year of osteopathic medical training. The advanced level electives IA and IIA offer students a chance to re-take the material and deepen their understanding.

This syllabus describes semester I which offers an opportunity to explore the principles and practice of the Biodynamic model of osteopathy. The course includes lecture, discussions and lab practical sessions as well as intersession assignments. 

The biodynamic model is designed around the idea that each osteopathic physician should experience and explore the principles of osteopathic medicine using the language and tools provided as a guide rather than a proscriptive toolkit. Further, they should rely on clinical results to make decisions about the principles of practice that they find are most effective. It is not a set of techniques or treatment tools but rather a deep exploration of principles of practice. Each student will, therefore, have a unique experience in the course, bringing their own sensory experience and skills to bear on the learning.

Note: Open to first- and second-year medical students only

 

Children's Oral Health for Primary Care Providers (Fall & Spring)  

OPCC 664      Available Fall 2019 & Spring 2020

Course Coordinator:

     Gail Feinberg, DO, MEd, FACOFP (gail.feinberg@tu.edu)

Course Description

This interdisciplinary course is intended to prepare primary care providers in medicine, nursing, and physician assistants for oral health care in infants in children, and to promote and enhance the collaborative and interprofessional effort by healthcare providers in delivering effective preventive and/or primary oral health care for children.  Clinical experience and case simulation sessions will be conducted in an integrated learning environment.

Note: Open to OMS I, OMS II, PA and NP Students 

 

Clinical Skills for Boards and Wards (Summer)    

OPCC 669      

Course Coordinator:

     Gail Feinberg, DO, MEd, FACOFP (gail.feinberg@tu.edu)

Course Description

This course aims to help students be prepared for clinical rotations as well as the clinical skills needed to succeed on USMLE Step 1/COMLEX. The course will be comprised of two 3-hour sessions on May 28th, 2019, during a dedicated study period. The first session will include brief, high yield instruction regarding interpreting imaging, labs, heart sounds, and EKGs as needed in clinical rotations and on the board exams. The second session will include patient case reports and practice boards-style questions relevant to the material covered. The morning session will be a lecture format and the afternoon session will be TBL-style. Given the TBL format, there is no limit on the number of participants. 

The board exams have evolved in recent years to include a need for more clinical skills that are not sufficiently covered in board prep resources. For example, many board prep resources prepare students to ID heart sounds based on where and when the murmur is heard and a description of the sound. However, on the 2018 boards, most of these questions were presented in a digital animation where the student had to listen to a number of listening posts and interpret the heart sound with very little guidance in the question stem. Similar issues were encountered with regards to EKG interpretation and imaging. Students who take this course can utilize it in lieu of trying to find adequate outside resources and should after the course is completed, feel ready to tackle these questions on the board exam with little or no other preparation. Additionally, participation in this course will help students bridge the gap between preclinical education, boards preparation, and clinical rotations. Much of the information learned in the classroom and through boards prep resources are presented in a fashion that doesn’t directly translate to the clinical experience. This course will allow students to avoid arriving on rotations with a lot of knowledge that they struggle to apply to patient care.

Attendance: Two 3-hour sessions on Tuesday, May 28th in LH-A (9 am - 12 pm, 1 pm - 4 pm).

Note: Open only to OMS II's 

 

Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Coaching (Fall & Spring)    

OPCC 670   Available Fall 2019 & Spring 2020        

Diverse Perspectives on Developmental Disabilities and Health

 

Course Co-Coordinators

       Jay Shubrook, DO (jay.shubrook@tu.edu)

       Anne Lee, RD, CDE (anne.lee4@tu.edu)

       Grace Jones, PhD (grace.jones@tu.edu)

Course Description

This elective course provides an opportunity for TUCA students to learn evidence-based practices in health coaching. The National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) is a well-known national program that works with people at risk for type 2 diabetes and works with them on a yearlong program focused on lifestyle modifications. This elective is a 12-hour class time that involves interprofessional group work and team-based coaching that will lead to a certificate of completion in the CDC Lifestyle Coaching Program. Completion of this program makes the candidate eligible to lead the National Diabetes Prevention Program in the community. This program has been shown to be effective in research and community settings. Further, it has been shown to be cost-effective; hence, it has become a mandated covered benefit for people with Medicare and MediCAL. 

The goal of this course series is to guide students in working with an interprofessional team and to take a multidisciplinary approach in exploring the prevention of diabetes, helping people navigate health behavioral change. 

The Lifestyle Coach training will occur every month during the ECE (Early Clinical Exposure) time. Candidates who start a series will need to complete that specific series to get credit for the elective. The exact schedule for training depends on the cohort in which students are enrolled.

Note: Open to all students

2019 DPP Coach Training Schedule

 

 

Diabetes and Translational Science A: From Bench to Bedside

(Fall)     OPCC 667A   Available Fall 2019         

Diabetes and Translational Science B: From Bedside to Community 

(Spring)     OPCC 667B     Available Spring 2020

Diabetes and Translational Science

Course Co-Coordinators

     Sumera Ahmed, MD (sumera.ahmed2@tu.edu)

     Joy Dugan, PA-C, MPH (joy.dugan@tu.edu)

     Jay Shubrook, DO (jay.shubrook@tu.edu)

     Clipper Young, PharmD, MPH (clipper.young@tu.edu)

Course Description

Course A. This hydride -- online and live sessions -- elective course is the first in a two-part series. The course utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to explore the causes of diabetes mellitus to include underlying genetics and pathophysiology and clinically relevant topics. The structure of this course consists of a series of online lectures that highlight faculty members who do extensive work in the field of diabetes across the Touro University California’s academic system. As the first course in this series, students will explore the biological and pharmaceutical sciences pertaining to diabetes. Landmark clinical trials will be discussed to understand guidelines for diabetes diagnosis and management.

Course B. This hydride -- online and live sessions -- elective course is the second in a two-part diabetes didactic course series. This course utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to explore clinical and social sciences pertaining to diabetes, understanding the theme “from bedside to community.” The structure of this course consists of a series of modules created by faculty members who do extensive work in the field of diabetes across Touro University California academic system.

Note: Open to all students

 

Diverse Perspectives on Developmental Disabilities and Health (Fall)     

OMMC 654   Available Fall 2019         

Diverse Perspectives on Developmental Disabilities and Health

 

Course Coordinator

          Kimberly Wolf, DO (kimberly.wolf@tu.edu)

Course Description

The objective of this course is to begin to prepare future health professionals to work with patients with developmental disabilities and their support network to provide complete and effective care. The course content will allow students to build their capacity around appreciating early signs and symptoms as well as identify and manage patients with developmental disabilities.  Students will also become familiar with attitudes towards patients with developmental disabilities and how social structures influence the social determinants of health.

Note: Open only to all medical students

 

Functional Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (Spring)  

BSCC 673   Available Spring 2020

FNLM

Course Co-Coordinators

      Grace Jones, PhD (grace.jones@tu.edu)

      Yasmin Bains, PCD Academic Fellow (yasmin.bains@tu.edu)    

Course Description

This elective will provide osteopathic medical students with a foundation in the application of nutrition science in the clinical setting. The course will comprise seven (7) sessions and include an introduction to diet trends, explore the intersection of nutrition and chronic disease and build student confidence in incorporating evidence-based nutrition and other lifestyle practices into a patient encounter. The elective is designed to include a combination of traditional and team-based classroom learning as well as experiential activities comprising food demos/preparation and campus community engagement.    

Course Schedule

Note: Open to medical students only

 

 

Fundamentals of Global Health I (Fall)     

BSCC 668       Available Fall 2019

Global Health Elective

Course Co-Coordinators

     Eiman Mahmoud, MD, MPH (eiman.mahmoud@tu.edu)

     H. Eduardo Velasco, MD, PhD, MSc (H.Eduardo.Velasco@tu.edu)

Course Description

The primary goal of the course is to transfer information into knowledge that will prepare the student to work with underserved communities locally and globally. The course will present an overview of issues in global health from the viewpoint of many different disciplines. The course will introduce students to the principles and practice of global health. Using six leading global health topics as examples, students will be introduced to basic concepts of global health, with a focus on closing the gap between global health science and practice at home and abroad.
Note: Open to medical students only
 

Fundamentals of Global Health II (Spring)  

BSCC 669   Available Spring 2020

Global Health Elective

Course Co-Coordinators

     Eiman Mahmoud, MD, MPH (eiman.mahmoud@tu.edu)

Course Description

Unit 1 provides an opportunity for an examination of basic issues of health in developing countries with the country and specific diseases given as examples for each issue. Unit 2 familiarizes students with current strategies for implementation and delivery of intervention programs and provides an opportunity for students to critically analyze the intervention and public health programs in developing countries. Unit 3 introduces the student to the role of social, cultural, environmental, and developmental factors in shaping various aspects of health in developing countries. Unit 4 introduces the student to challenges of policies and strategies in public health – a comparative study. This course, offered in the spring semester, is a prerequisite to Global Health: Summer Internship.

 

Global Health Internship (Summer)     BSCC 670     3.0 units

Course Co-Coordinators

     Eiman Mahmoud, MD, MPH (eiman.mahmoud@tu.edu)

     Tamira Elul, PhD (tamira.elul@tu.edu)

     Athena Lin, PhD (athena.lin@tu.edu)

     Site coordinator (varies per site)

Course Description

The mission of the Global Health Summer Internship is to serve, to learn, and to teach. The summer program has been set up to provide the TUCOM students interested in Global Health and Tropical Medicine an opportunity to learn about various endemic diseases around the globe, improve on their clinical skills in the diagnosis and management of these diseases and begin to understand the challenges that confront medical practitioners specifically in developing countries. The internship also offers avenues for research and service-learning projects particularly in the area of public health. Available sites currently include Mexico, Bolivia, Tanzania, and Ethiopia, for clinical, 20 research and service projects, and Taiwan and Israel for clinical training only. The summer internship is not designed to be an elective rotation for credit for TUCOM students, although the sites are available for elective rotations.

 

Helping Babies BreatheNewborn Stabilization in the Developing World (Spring)         

OPCC 660     Available Spring 2020

Babies 

Course Co-Coordinators

     Eiman Mahmoud, MD, MPH (eiman.mahmoud@tu.edu)

     Tami Hendriksz, DO (tami.hendriksz@tu.edu)

     Christina Kinnevey, MD (christina.kinnevey@tu.edu)

Course Description

HBB is an evidence-based educational program to teach neonatal resuscitation techniques in resource-limited areas. This course will provide learners with the ability to teach the HBB program during the Global Health summer internship to local individuals who will be providing these services.  This course is available to all students enrolled in Global Health Elective, and mandatory for students participating in the Global Health Summer Internship at the Africa sites.

Note: Open to medical students only

 

Integrative Medicine: Clinical Cases (Fall and Spring) 

OMMC 650A - Fall; OMMC 650B - Spring    

Integrative Medicine Elective
 

Course Coordinator

     Victor Nuño, DO (victor.nuno@tu.edu)

Course Description

This course is designed to provide an introduction to integrative medicine. The course is comprised of eight sessions at which times we will cover various topics. 
  • Topics include:
    • Integrative Management of Anxiety and Depression
    • The Brain and Well Being
    • Nutrition 101
    • Dietary Supplements
    • Sex, Mood, and Microbiome
    • Ecological Medicine
    • The Gut Microbiome in Pain and Depression
    • Integrative Approaches to Common Conditions

 Note: Open to all students

 

Life-Saving Hospital Procedures for the Medical Student (Fall)

OPCC 668     Available Fall 2020


 
Pericardiocentesis.jpg

Course Coordinator

     K. Scott Whitlow, DO (kscott.whitlow@tu.edu)

Course Description

This course will involve six sessions, each beginning with a preliminary, interactive PowerPoint presentation followed by a 2-3 hour cadaveric lab demonstration and subsequent medical student performance of 8 such basic, life-saving procedures. Proposed procedures include but may not be limited to Chest Tube Insertion, Cricothyroidotomy, Emergent Open Tracheostomy, Needle Decompression of Chest, Thoracentesis, Pericardiocentesis, Insertion of Central Venous Catheter, Suture Ligation of Bleeding Vessel.

 

Note: Open to only OMS II

 

Medical Spanish (Fall & Spring)     OPCC 650     Available Fall 2019 & Spring 2020

Course Coordinator

     TBA

Course Description

This beginner's course is offered in the Fall semester with the objective of developing a foundational level of medical Spanish adequate for the student to determine the chief complaint of the Spanish-speaking patient, provide basic medical instructions, obtain information about the patient, and answer the patient's most common questions. These objectives will be achieved through the teaching of Spanish medical terminology, colloquial words and phrases, and some basic grammar, as well as through practice sessions in conducting histories and physicals in Spanish.

Note: Open to OMS II students only; before registering for this elective course, please always seek approval from Dr. Menini using the elective course registration form.  

 

OMT Lab (Summer)     OMMC 653         Available Summer 2020

Course Coordinator:

     Nicole Peña, DO (nicole.pena@tu.edu

Course Description

This course is a one-semester, a summer course in which students work as OMT demonstration providers in the H-89 OMT lab. Elective participants will work with lab volunteers and a faculty preceptor as they obtain a history, physical exam, and provide an OMT demonstration.

Note: Open only to medical students 

 

Palliative Care (Spring)     OPCC 666     

Course Coordinator

     Catherine West, MD, DrPH (catherine.west@tu.edu)

Course Description

This will be an interprofessional 12-hour course open to students in the osteopathic medicine, pharmacy, physician assistant, and nursing programs. It will offer interactive didactic sessions on pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic strategies for the management of pain and non-pain symptoms in the palliative care setting. The course will emphasize an interprofessional team-based cost-effective approach to patient care that maximizes patient values, comfort, and safety. Students will practice this approach themselves in interprofessional teams with case simulations and have the opportunity to observe an interprofessional panel of experts.

Note: Open to all students

 

Pediatric Obesity Prevention Program (Fall & Spring)    

Part A: OPCC 671A  Available Fall 2019 

Part B: OPCC 671B  Available Spring 2019         

 HAPPY

Course Coordinator:

      Tami Hendriksz, DO (tami.hendriksz@tu.edu)

Course Description

Community Health: Pediatric Obesity Prevention Program [aka, The Project HAPPY (Healthy Attitudes Produce Positive Youth)] elective is an opportunity for Touro students to engage with the community by using patient education and behavioral modification to establish healthy habits and decrease the rate of pediatric obesity. This is the first half of a two-part series that provides students with the opportunity to counsel families, employ practice-based learning, and participate in an ongoing research project. 

Project HAPPY Elective Part A trains students to lead the family-based behavioral modification research program that is currently underway in Vallejo, CA. Project HAPPY pairs participating Vallejo families with a Touro student health navigator who delivers a predetermined curriculum that addresses attitudes toward health and wellness. 

Students participating in the elective will gain foundational knowledge in nutrition, physical activity, and wellness of pediatric and adult populations. Upon completion of Part A, students will be eligible to enroll in Project HAPPY Elective Part B, in which they will partner with a family to guide them through the Project HAPPY curriculum.

Note: Completion of Project HAPPY Elective Part A is required for enrollment in Project HAPPY Part B.

   

Summer Clinical Preceptorship (Summer)     OPCC 658        Available Summer 2020

Course Coordinator

     Alesia Wagner, DO (alesia.wagner@tu.edu)

Course Description

This class is intended to provide students with the opportunity to apply basic science knowledge in a clinical setting during an otherwise non-academic time; i.e., between the first and second years. Students will, with approval of the course coordinator, work with a faculty member of TUCOM, a clinician at another institution, or a licensed physician in the community, in order to observe medical practice in an area of medicine and a clinical setting of their choice.

 

 

Taboo: A Study of Medical Bias (Spring)     OPCC 665     Available Spring 2020


 

Course Coordinator:

     Tami Hendriksz, DO (tami.hendriksz@tu.edu)

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to health care inequalities related to implicit bias and explores 6 common biases in healthcare: gender, obesity, race, sexuality, socioeconomic status, and drug misuse. Topics will be explored through peer-teaching, articles, video clips, reflective writing, and class discussions.

Note: Open to all students 

 

 

The Healer’s Art (Spring)     OPCC 659     Available Spring 2020

Art 

Course Co-Coordinators:

     Catherine West, MD, DrPH (catherine.west@tu.edu)

     Nicole Peña, DO (nicole.pena@tu.edu)

Course Description

The Healer’s Art, developed by Dr. Rachel Naomi Remen, was first presented at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine in 1993 and, as of 2008, had been successfully replicated in 59 medical schools in the US and abroad. It addresses the hidden crisis in medicine, the growing loss of meaning and commitment experienced by physicians nationwide under the stresses of today’s health care system. The course is comprised of five interactive sessions entitled: Discovering and Nurturing Your Wholeness; Sharing Grief and Honoring Loss (2); Beyond Analysis: Allowing Awe in Medicine, and The Care of the Soul: Service as a Way of Life.

Note: Open to medical students only

 

 

Wilderness Medicine: Mountain Medicine (Spring)    

BSCC 672     Available Spring 2020

Course Coordinator:

     Greg Gayer, PhD (greg.gayer@tu.edu)

Course Description

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the management of common medical issues specific to mountainous environments. The course is comprised of four self-study sections including 1) high altitude illness 2) thermoregulation 3) trauma and improvised medicine and 4) backcountry OMT. There will also be two, one-day interactive sessions in which students will go into the field and practice skills such as improvised litters, splinting, and OMT considerations in the backcountry.

Note: Requested by students only; open only to medical students